Male pattern baldness is a bit of a misnomer, given that it can happen to anyone. Technically, if it happens to a woman, it’s female pattern hair loss.

Either way, the fact that a well-known celebrity like Rosie O’Donnell was brave enough to photograph her own ageing drama and post it on Twitter for all to see, has been enough to get folks talking about a thing that women usually prefer to sweep under the carpet.

Female pattern hair loss

Unlike male pattern baldness which typically starts at the temples and works its way back to a bald spot on the crown, while leaving much of the hair around the neck and ears unscathed, female pattern hair loss is simply a general thinning of the hair in those areas, and actual baldness is very rare.

However, while baldness is well-known in men, women have been much more inventive over time in disguising their hair loss. Women can style their hair – both long and short – in many different ways, using a battery of tools and products to give it more volume and bounce.

How science and technology can help

It’s not just men who can enlist the expertise of a hair transplant surgeon – women can, too – and a few strategically transplanted follicle units can do wonders for a post-menopausal woman’s hairline.

Less extreme a measure, perhaps, but requiring long-term commitment and application, is rogaine – scientifically proven to promote hair growth, it should be applied twice daily to the scalp over a period of months, for results to become noticeable. Hair extensions, applied by a well-trained professional, will add volume to thinning hair.

Looking your best

Most people want to look good, but not everyone wants to go to that much trouble. We can thank Rosie O’Donnell for putting female pattern baldness under the spotlight and empowering women to share their experiences. Rosie has made it ok for women to talk about the condition, at last.