Hair loss is now affecting women more than ever before and the cause could be linked to stress. It’s not a major secret that high levels of stress can cause the hair to start shedding at an alarming rate. However, there has been a lot of contradictory information provided with some experts claiming stress doesn’t have much of an impact on the hair and others claiming it does.

So is stress affecting your tresses or is it a myth?

Stress can cause hair loss

Stress absolutely can cause different levels of hair loss. Everyone is different and so the way stress affects one person will differ to how it affects another. That’s why some people are more prone to hair loss when they experience high levels of stress.

There’s a lot of pressure placed upon women these days in both their social and work environments. This has contributed massively towards the current female hair loss epidemic. Some women have even experienced up to 40% hair loss, while in rare cases it’s resulted in total baldness.

The good news is there are plenty of treatment options out there these days that can help restore the hair and prevent further loss.

Treatment options available

The type of treatment you should opt for will depend upon a number of factors. The degree of hair loss experienced is obviously one of the major considerations. The main treatments available include:

  • Minoxidil
  • Hair transplant
  • SMP
  • Low level laser treatment

Minoxidil tends to be one of the most effective for mild, temporary hair loss. It’s a topical treatment that is easy to get hold of and is also simple to apply.

However, if your problem is more severe, a hair transplant or SMP may be a better option. Hair transplants are expensive and don’t always work. So out of the two, SMP which involves tattooing the scalp to give the appearance of hair follicles, does tend to be the best option.

Overall if you suspect stress if causing hair loss, it’s important to visit a doctor to get a proper diagnosis. These could be another hidden root cause that needs to be addressed.